‘Is This A Joke’: People Roast AP For Report On How To Address Impeachment During Thanksgiving

When the family gathers around the dinner table on Thursday afternoon for a Thanksgiving meal, most people already know that certain subjects ought to be avoided: politics, religion, family issues or other gossips.

It’s almost an integrated part of the holiday season, not talking about these points. Instead, enjoy family time. Talk about one another and other things you are thankful for.

For those that wish to politicize their family gathering, the Associated Press took every precaution this year to offer its readers a guide on how to discuss the ongoing impeachment effort of President Trump.

Take a look:

The Associated Press notes how several individuals experienced previous Thanksgiving meals—like in 2016 shortly after President Trump was elected—and how political conversations unfolded. Then comes the advice:

Elaine Swann, a Los Angeles-based etiquette coach, advises hosts to have a plan to deal with polarizing discussions amid “all this talk about impeachment” in the air, along with the aromas of oyster dressing and freshly baked pumpkin pies.

“I do think it’s healthy for people to express themselves and to have those conversations,” said Swann, who will host her family’s Thanksgiving. “My advice is to take a route to allow some sort of platform, but with guidelines.”

One tactic: sequester the debates. She’ll have a room away from the dining table stocked with snacks for people who want to talk politics. She also suggests designating a calm family member as a combination moderator-peacekeeper.

And:

Swann, who will host around 30 people, said that if guests start tearing into one another like drumsticks, “make sure that in your arsenal as a host you have some family-building activity to get everybody out of it.”

Games can be a good diversion or, Swann suggested, invite people to bring family photos to share that will stir warm memories.

If the debate starts getting out of hand Thursday, Wright said, someone will probably defuse things by asking: “How about those Bengals?”

Cincinnati’s hapless pro football team is winless this season.

The bottom line, Swann said, is cherishing the time together.

“Although we may not agree politically, the one thing we are is family,” she said. “The big takeaway that I encourage everyone to have is that love for family, because tomorrow is not promised to us, and you never know who is going to wake up the next day and who is not.”

Several people online mocked the post saying there were “too many snowflakes” out there.

“No, this is not a joke,” Twitchy wrote in response to the tweet. “If your family can’t handle a debate maybe don’t gather for a holiday meal in the first place.”

Check out these responses: