Starbucks Shop Kicks Police Officers Out On July 4th After Customer ‘Did Not Feel Safe’

Six police officers at a Starbucks shop in Tempe, Arizona were reportedly drinking coffees before their shifts were set to begin when they were asked by a barista to leave.

Fox News reports the barista’s request came after an unidentified customer complained about them being there, saying the customer “did not feel safe.”

The Tempe Officers Association confirmed the situation on Twitter where they said: “Six Tempe police officers stopped by the Starbucks at Scottsdale Road and McKellips for coffee. The officers paid for their drinks and stood together having a cup of coffee before their long 4th of July shift.”

“They were approached by a barista, who knew one of the officers by name because he is a regular at that location. The barista said that a customer ‘did not feel safe’ because of the police presence,” the Association continued. “The barista asked the officers to move out of the customer’s line of sight or to leave.”

The Associated added, “Disappointed, the officers did in fact leave.”

“This treatment of public safety workers could not be more disheartening. While the barista was polite, making such a request at all was offensive. Unfortunately, such treatment has become all too common in 2019,” the Association said later. “We know this is not a national policy at Starbucks Corporate and we look forward to working collaboratively with them on this important dialogue.”

Fox News reports a Starbucks spokesperson said they were still collecting details of the incident but confirmed the brand has “deep respect for the Tempe Police and their service to the community.”

“We’ve reached out to the Tempe Police Department and Tempe Officers Association to better understand what happened and apologize. We want everyone in our stores to feel welcomed and the incident described is not indicative of what we want any of our customers to feel in our stores,” spokesman Reggie Borges reportedly told the Daily Caller.

The Daily Caller adds:

“We couldn’t apologize more for how they felt and it’s really not an indication of how we feel about law enforcement,” he [Borges] added, pointing to Starbucks’ “Coffee with a Cop” program as evidence that the company supports law enforcement officers.

Borges did not dispute the sequence of events described by the Tempe Police Association. He also said it was too early to say whether the barista will face disciplinary action over the incident.