Dem 2020 Candidate Claims She Can Get Republican Support: ‘I Know Where The Bodies Are Buried’

Democratic presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar claimed she could work alongside a Republican majority in the Senate to get things done for the country because she knows “where the bodies are buried.”

During an interview with CNBC correspondent John Harwood, the Senator from Minnesota said she could reach across the aisle and work with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in a productive way.

“I do think you have to work across the aisle to get things done,” Klobuchar said, via the Washington Examiner. “But as we’ve learned over the years with how Sen. McConnell runs the Senate, you have to stand your ground. You have to make clear where you are not going to budge, where you’re going to stand up for the people of this country. I would have a good understanding of that because I have worked with him and worked in the Senate for years.”

“I know those senators well. I’ve been in that Senate for a number of years now. When I look at the priorities I’ve laid out, including the pharmaceutical issue to bring the prices down, I know where the bodies are buried,” she added.

The Washington Examiner adds:

Klobuchar said she knows which senators could be persuaded “to do something out of just sheer political reasons because they’re going to lose in their state if they don’t do something about it.”

“This doesn’t mean you’re a pansy. It just means you’re a realist. That if you’re going to get things done, you’ve got to look to where you have friends, and where you have enemies, and move ahead and get it done,” she said.

Here’s a partial transcript of Klobuchar’s interview with Harwood, via CNBC:

John Harwood: There are a few people in the race — you’re one of them — making the argument that they can better attract Republican votes and attract Republican cooperation on some of their priorities when they come in. When Gov. [John] Hickenlooper got in the race, he said, “I’m going to walk down to Mitch McConnell’s office and I’m going to sit down and talk to him and persuade him to do things that we believe in.” A lot of people watching that had the reaction of, are you kidding? Have you been paying attention the last 10 years? That’s ridiculous. Why is that view wrong?

Amy Klobuchar: I do think you have to work across the aisle to get things done. But as we’ve learned over the years with how Senator McConnell runs the Senate, you have to stand your ground. You have to make clear where you are not going to budge, where you’re going to stand up for the people of this country. I would have a good understanding of that because I have worked with him and worked in the Senate for years.

John Harwood: You really think that, where President Obama could not get Republican cooperation on almost any of the major things that he was doing, you could?

Amy Klobuchar: I know those senators well. I’ve been in that Senate for a number of years now. When I look at the priorities I’ve laid out, including the pharmaceutical issue to bring the prices down, I know where the bodies are buried. I know, despite the fact that you’ve got two lobbyists for every member of Congress, which senators are willing to work like Sen. Grassley on bringing down the prices of pharmaceuticals and which ones I think could be pushed to do something out of just sheer political reasons because they’re going to lose in their state if they don’t do something about it.

But you need a president that’s willing to make it an issue. Or infrastructure — there’s no such thing as a Republican bridge or a Democratic bridge. There’s bridges in every state. There’s transit and roads and schools that are crumbling. I also know which senators want to work on that.

This doesn’t mean you’re a pansy. It just means you’re a realist. That if you’re going to get things done, you’ve got to look to where you have friends, and where you have enemies, and move ahead and get it done. You have to set those priorities from day one when you get into the White House.