Jesse Jackson: Outrage over Dropping Charges Against Smollett is ‘Fake News’

Rev. Jesse Jackson has now weighed in on the Jussie Smollett case.

He has released a statement calling the decision by the prosecutors to drop the charges against Smollett as “the correct call, consistent with justice and mercy” and saying that criticism of State’s Attorney Kim Foxx must stop.

From Daily Caller:

The statement also praised “progressive prosecutor” Kim Foxx for recusing herself from the case, comparing her decision to that of former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who “also did the right thing when he recused himself from the investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential campaign.”

Apparently he hasn’t kept up with the news that her office has claimed that she didn’t actually formally recuse herself, despite her contact with Obama former chief of staff Tina Tchen and a Smollett family member. That contact prompted Foxx to allegedly intervene in the case to try to have the Chicago PD turn over to the FBI which they did not do. Prosecutors’ associations have blasted Foxx’s actions and the FBI is now reviewing her actions.

What did Jackson find was the real problem?

The fact that people were outraged over the dismissal. He called the outrage “fake news.”

The outrage over the Jussie Smollett case is misplaced and out of proportion. It is being used from City Hall to the White House to deflect and distract from City Hall to the White House. It is fake news. The voices that are crying out the loudest seem to have only recently found their sense of righteous indignation.

He then attacked Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, the Chicago Police and their handling of prior cases, calling attention to their record of unsolved murders.

Ironically, what Jackson failed to note that because of Smollett’s stories, he drew attention away from legitimate crimes that needed solving.

According to Jackson, it was “time to move on” and to focus on the election for mayor on Tuesday.

When prosecutors asked for dismissal of the charges they noted that Smollett had done community service ‘in the past.’ The ‘community service’ turned out to be that he spent two days, about an hour for each dismissed felony charge, at Jackson’s ‘Operation Push,’ purportedly talking to people there and stuffing envelopes. Smollett’s lawyers even dispute that this was court ordered, claiming that the charges were dismissed without any conditions.